What to do if my SEO sucks?

What to do if my SEO sucks?

Congrats on actually realizing that your SEO needs work. Most small businesses are stuck in yearly contracts with well known SEO companies, and have not a clue if their SEO is working or not. They keep paying their monthly fees, year after year, not quite understanding the difference between SEO that generates a positive return on their investment, versus cheap SEO that never follows through on those promises.

Do a quick Google search for “Insert name of SEO company here + complaints” and you will find hundreds, if not thousands of small businesses who reviewed their experiences with SEO experts who did not come through on their promises.

You might be surprised to learn those large, flashy web design and SEO companies are not as high tech or helpful as you had hoped.

How can you vet these SEO experts before signing on the dotted line?

A quick search on Neil Patels Uber Suggest Keyword tool will help you sort out the real SEO experts from the wanna be’s.

https://neilpatel.com/ubersuggest/

Enter the website address of the SEO company you are looking to work with. You will see most of the keywords that this company ranks for and their positions. If they rank on page 3, 5, 30, 88? You know they do not understand how to rank their own website on the first page of Google, so why would you trust them to do the same for your company?

What to do to get your companies website back on track?

Call Sandy at 775-870-0488 for a free 15 minute session, no strings attached.

Marketing Plan For Manufacturing Company: 4 Steps To Develop A Marketing Plan For Your Company

Marketing Plan For Manufacturing Company: 4 Steps To Develop A Marketing Plan For Your Company

Developing a marketing plan for a manufacturing company is crucial for success in the B2B market. The ‘marketing plan’ is a sheet of paper that clearly lays out a marketing strategy for your business in order to attract customers. Let’s start from the basics: Manufacturing companies form partnerships with other businesses that place orders – usually for large amounts of products. How do you know where to find customers ready to place huge orders with your company? Follow the 4-step process we’ve laid out below to know how to devise a marketing plan for your company.

The key to a successful manufacturing company marketing plan is to include all possible marketing avenues: Paid marketing and free marketing. The marketing plan for manufacturing company PDF has to include objectives such as sales targets you’re trying to reach and the budget – i.e. how much you’re willing to spend to get there. Instead of focusing all your efforts on one marketing strategy, you should employ a mix of different marketing strategies that will give you an advantage over your competitors.

Step 1) Develop An Edge

The first step is to become a thought leader in your industry by employing branding strategies that give you an edge over your competitors. While this method is free, you’ll have to put a lot of effort to stand out and highlight the differences between you and other manufacturing companies.

  • When a customer is looking to place an order with your company, they are directly comparing you to dozens of other manufacturers. How do you stand out? One word: Branding.

In order for customers to view your company as superior, you have to present yourself as a leader in your manufacturing industry.  Start by developing products that stand out and/or offering better deals on prices. The key here is to give an advantage that other companies wouldn’t and make concessions which make it more profitable to deal with your company than competitors. This is your brand.

Organize events in your industry that give you a platform to promote your products. Once the word gets out, you will become recognizable in your industry and get customers through word of mouth.

Step 2) Set Clear Goals                                                

As part of your marketing plan for manufacturing company sample, you have to set clear objectives about what you’re trying to achieve in the short term and the long term. These objectives can be revised based on performance, but it important to set them early on. For instance, you should have a 1-month target and a 12-month target.

  • The objectives should be marked down as sales or total figures. Example: You want to do $10,000/month in sales within 3 months or 10 new customers in 2 months.

Step 3) Develop Sample Marketing Plan For Manufacturing Company

To develop a marketing plan, the strategy has to be based around your marketing objectives. For instance, at the start you may want to spend more on paid advertising (Google AdWords, Instagram, YouTube Ads) that will give you exposure in front of new customers and later you may want to invest in free advertising such as SEO that will drive new customers to your business over the course of many years – all while developing your brand.

Utilize all marketing avenues at your disposal. As a manufacturing company your target market is the B2B market – make sure you have a presence on all large B2B trade websites like Alibaba where customers from all over the world are looking to buy directly from manufacturers.

Step 4) Revise Performance

The marketing plan is never set in stone – you can expect your marketing plan to change significantly within the first month. Always be prepared for revisions in the long term. If the marketing campaigns turn out successful – double-down on them and spend more on those campaigns while cutting out low performers.

Don’t get attached to marketing campaigns: If they don’t end up performing the way you expect them, cut them out of the marketing plan. The key here is to remain objective and focus on the performance metrics that give you a clear overview of where you get the best ROI. Once you’ve accumulated the data based on a number of different marketing techniques, you can start making revisions to the marketing plan.

 

Logo Color Psychology: the Complete Guide to Choosing Brand Colors

Logo Color Psychology: the Complete Guide to Choosing Brand Colors

Your logo is a powerful, visual element. Ideally, it creates instant recognition and makes people feel more connected to your brand. The colors you select may play a more important role in this than you realize. In fact, color can increase brand recognition by up to 80%. So, which colors should you pick? That depends. What are you selling, and who are you trying to sell it to? Also, what kind of emotions and actions are you trying to evoke?

color in logo design reno

This article will dig into the psychology of color in order to help you select the right color scheme for your target audience. If you select the right colors, you can create a logo that has more impact than if you had simply chosen colors according to your tastes.

How Does Color Impact Behavior and Emotion?

First, the way that we see and process visual data is complex. This includes colors. How we see color can be influenced by our culture, experiences, context, and socialization. It’s not as simple a matter as yellow is upbeat, and blue is relaxing. For example, white signifies purity and innocence in some cultures, but in others, it represents death and mourning. Perceptions of colors can change over time.

best logo designers near me

That’s why it’s important to take a thoughtful approach to this. Color selection is a complex topic, and it should be done with all of your branding goals taken into consideration. Don’t make these decisions based on simplistic interpretations of pop psychology.

There’s another reason to take this process slowly. You should consider your logo a permanent part of your branding. Yes, it may be possible to make changes in the future, but that’s a complex task. Many brands have tried at this and failed. To get started, let’s get a better understanding of color.

Seeing Color in Logos

When you look at an object, it may seem as if you perceive everything about it at once. You don’t consciously see color, then texture, then shape, then size, etc. In reality, though, you do process the various types of visual input differently. Color is the first thing that you see. That may be why it’s such an important factor in recall.

The Meaning of Colors

Here are some general ideas about the ways in which colors are perceived. Keep in mind that these can vary according to culture. If you find symbolism that will be relevant to your target audience, that’s great. Just keep factors such as internationalization in mind.

Yellow

Like most other colors, there are positive and negative associations. The positives are:

  • Bright and Happy
  • Springtime, flowers, warmth.
  • Gold and good fortune.

 

The negatives include:

  • Caution or warning
  • Fear or cowardice
  • Illness
  • Envy or jealousy

 

Mcdonald’s uses gold and a bit of red in their logo. That’s not surprising considering that the brand’s entire visual identity is about making every interaction a happy one.

Purple

Historically, the color purple was only worn by the rich or royalty. It’s still a symbol of power and luxury. Purple also creates an aura of mystery and protection. There’s also a distinct, feminine feel. This is especially true with lighter or pinkish hues. In the United States and other Western cultures, it can also be associated with creativity and thought.

 

Lady Speed Stick, Hallmark, and Cadbury all have predominantly purple logos. These brands also market entirely or largely to women.

Red

Red is bold, fiery, intense, angry, romantic, dangerous, even hungry. At least that’s what the color can mean in some cultures. In Asian cultures, it can mean luck, fertility, joy, and prosperity.

 

ESPN and Virgin all have red logos. As a sports brand, ESPN reflects the intensity of competition in their logo. Much of Virgin’s branding is centered around the lifestyle of a known adventurer, Richard Branson.

Green

Because green is found so widely in nature, it only makes sense that people associate with the outdoors, spring, and renewal. It’s the color of choice for environmental organizations, efforts for peace, and brands that want to be associated with the concept of ‘natural’. Green also represents money, wealth, and in some cases, greed. It is also associated with luck and fortune.

 

John Deere and BP both use green in their logos. It’s easy to see why a company associated with farming would choose that color. BP changed to a green logo fairly recently in an effort to appeal to environmentally conscious consumers.

Blue

Blue is another color that is widely seen in nature. It appears in the sky and in the ocean. Because of that, people associate with tranquility and calm. It is also a cool color. Brands often use blue as a way to symbolize trustworthiness and stability.

 

IBM has even adopted the nickname, Big Blue. WebMD, PayPal, LinkedIn, and The Weather Channel all prominently feature the color blue as well. That’s not surprising since each brand strongly relies on trust and credibility. Oddly, blue can also symbolize a melancholy mood.

Orange

Orange can also be seen as bold, warm, and full of energy. People associate it with fall weather and fire. It’s also a harvest color. In eastern cultures, orange is associated with feasting, spirituality, even sacrifice. American’s also associate it with the Thanksgiving and Halloween holidays.

 

SoundCloud and Nickelodeon both use orange in their logos. As lifestyle and entertainment brands their designers may have wanted to exude feelings of energy and intensity.

White

We talked about white above. It’s connected with innocence and purity. There’s also an association with cleanliness which is why it’s used in medical settings. White Castle used white as a key color in its branding so that people would associate the restaurant with cleanliness. It’s also an important color in weddings in Western cultures. Finally, white can create positive and negative space for a stark, visually compelling look.

 

The cotton industries logo unsurprisingly features white. Not only is that the color of raw cotton, but it also shows cleanliness and purity that they want people to associate with cotton products.

Black

Black is quite unique. On one hand, it symbolizes elegance, wealth, and power. It can also be associated with darkness, smoke, and uncleanliness. In some Asian cultures, it is a color that is used to create balance.

 

Black is often a confident choice of brands that are very well-established. Gucci, Prada, and Nike have black logos.

Your Colors Must Have Context

Okay, so it’s clear that colors can have many, often conflicting meanings. How do you ensure the colors you choose are perceived as how you intend them to be? The answer is context. For example, the color green in a logo with the recycling symbol is going to leave a different impression than the color green with a leprechaun and pot of gold.

 

The color scheme you choose should also be relevant to your product. There are certain colors that are largely associated with specific purposes. Here are some examples of that:

 

  • Pleasure: Pink, red, yellow, and purple are highly associated with pleasure. They work well with products of status and entertainment.
  • Practicality: Red, black, gray, blue, and green are associated with products that solve a problem.

 

You can also play with this concept. For example, luxury furniture blurs the line between functional and status. You could possibly use colors from both categories.

 

The color you choose may have positive associations in one context, but not in another. Consider the color yellow. Use it in a logo with flowers and other nature symbols, and it seems bright and cheery. Now, imagine yellow as the primary color in a logo for a company that makes dentures. Most people don’t want to associate the color yellow with teeth!

Color Text and Typography

The best way to use color is to consider the text and typography that will accompany it. Font and tagline are key tools for adding that context that you need. Typography can really add to the overall aesthetic of your logo. Text, of course, makes it clear what your brand is about, and what your logo is communicating.

Final Thoughts

Think of color psychology as one of many tools. Use it to help you as you try to select logo colors for maximum impact. Then, take other factors into consideration such as your target audience, tagline, and other branding considerations. If you do these things, you should be able to find the ideal color combination for your brand.

 

Author Byline:

 

Estelle Liotard is a senior writer, blogger and editor at EssaySupply, a professional academic essay writers service. She writes high-quality essays on digital marketing, online sales and their related industries for some best custom dissertation writing services with the intent to share practical advice with likeminded readers. In her spare time, Estelle blogs and likes to stay informed about mass communication trends.

Guide To Marketing For Manufacturing Company: How To Make Your Company Stand Out

Guide To Marketing For Manufacturing Company: How To Make Your Company Stand Out

Marketing for manufacturing companies is paramount during the early stages. Want to get clients who place million-dollar orders with your company? One word: Marketing. Most manufacturing companies get their orders from loyal customers who keep returning for more. This begs the question: How can a new company stand out and get their first customers? Marketing is paramount if your manufacturing company is in the early stages i.e. a start-up.

There are hundreds of potential approaches for manufacturing company marketing that an owner can use to make their products known. This guide will focus on the basics that manufacturing companies need to start marketing their company and create the foundation for future growth.

  • The ultimate goal here is to help your manufacturing company build a loyal customer base interested in placing huge orders on a recurring basis.
  • Recurring clients are the key to marketing for manufacturing company.

Understand The Customer

Use reverse-psychology to determine what the customers in your industry want – and give it to them. This is a proven method to get a head-start in a competitive industry when other manufacturers might slip. Instead of focusing on the company, focus on the customer and what they need. Put yourself in their shoes and imagine what you would do if you were looking for a manufacturer to order from. The buying process usually goes like this:

  • The customer needs X product in your manufacturing industry.
  • The customer researches 5-10 potential manufacturers to buy from.
  • The customer makes a decision based on metrics such as: price, brand, reputation, customer reviews, etc.

The best way to take advantage of this process is to offer an advantage that none of the other companies are offering. Example: If you’re an electric bike manufacturer and the average bike costs $2000, you could make your bikes cost $1499. If the product quality is kick-ass, the customers will keep returning for more.

Develop A Marketing Strategy (SEO, PPC, Alibaba, Social)

Marketing a manufacturing company is different because you’re essentially in the B2B (business-to-business) company and your target market are other entrepreneurs who purchase the products to re-sell at their stores or online businesses. However, this doesn’t mean that those people can’t be reached in the same way that other regular customers can’t. In fact, many of them are actively researching companies to buy from which makes it easier to market to them.

The key to reaching these people is to develop a marketing strategy that caters to people in your industry. Start by developing a presence on trade websites such as Alibaba and Global Sources where you can place your product in front of millions of people looking to buy from manufacturers directly.

Combine B2B marketplace presence with SEO and PPC strategies in your niche in order to cater to people directly looking for these keywords on search engines. Example: An electric bike parts company could target keywords like “Buy electric bike battery”. Smart placement gives you an advantage over all other competitors and you must utilize all marketing avenues at your disposal.

Need improvements in traffic, sales and leads? Call Sandy, top ranked SEO expert @ 775-870-0488.

Manufacturing Company Marketing Expert

 

 

How Much Should A Manufacturing Company Spend On Marketing? Full Cost Breakdown

How Much Should A Manufacturing Company Spend On Marketing? Full Cost Breakdown

 

The average business spends 5-10% of their annual profits on marketing (according to CMO Survey). In manufacturing, the average budget for marketing is 8% of the company’s annual profits. This guide will help you get a clear overview of how much you should plan to spend on your marketing budget and how to devise your profits accordingly.

The average amount varies significantly based on the size of the company and how established it is. We’ll have a look at how different companies perform based on the number of customers and total annual profits. The following figures represent average spending for manufacturing companies based on annual growth:

  • Manufacturing companies that grew by 1-15% in the last year spent 8% of their annual profits on marketing expenses.
  • Manufacturing companies that grew by 15-30% in the last year spent 20% of their annual profits on marketing expenses.
  • Manufacturing companies that grew by 30-100+% (highest) in the last year spent an average of 50% of their annual profits on marketing expenses.

On average, the higher the growth % of the manufacturing company, the more it spends on advertising. This is partially because new start-up manufacturing companies spend more on advertising and experience higher growth.

Example: If an electronics manufacturer generates $700,000 in annual profits – on average they will spend $56,000/year (8%) on marketing or $4600/month. However, there is no guarantee that same company won’t spend $350,000/year on marketing – or roughly 50%. This all depends on the individual business’s objectives and what they’re trying to achieve.

How Much Should A Manufacturing Company Spend On Marketing?

Read below to find out how much you should spend based on your growth rate. To plan your marketing budget, think about what stage your manufacturing company is at. Is this a new start-up company or are you established and already have a steady supply of customers?

If you’re an early-stage company aka a “start-up” you should spend more on advertising because you’ll need to get your first customers through the door. If you’re established and have a steady supply of customers, you should consider upgrading your production capabilities and lowering your marketing expenses.

  • New Manufacturing Companies
  • Recommended Spend: 30-50%/year

Start-up companies should spend higher amounts on their marketing. This is usually in the 30-50% revenue range for newcomers. If you don’t have any customers yet and can’t predict what your profits are going to be like, start small-testing with budgets such as $1000-5000 and then gradually ramp-up your ad spend. Instead of risking it all on a large marketing campaign, you need to familiarize yourself with the market and adjust your budget according to the results.

Determine how much you should spend based on the product you’re selling. If you manufacture a unique product which is hard to come by, you could spend as little as an established company (10-20%). If your product is highly popular and easy to find, you should spend the maximum amount possible to stand out.

  • Established Manufacturing Companies
  • Recommended Spend: 10-20%/Year

Established companies should spend less than start-up companies because they have the momentum and they need little money to stay competitive. The advantage they have over start-ups is a consistent client base that keeps re-ordering from them. This means they only need few new clients to replace older clients and fulfill their manufacturing quota.

On average, an established manufacturing business should spend 10-20% of its yearly profits on marketing. This should be adjusted according to the competition level in your industry. If you’re in a very competitive industry you may want to go above 20%. If the competition is lower, you can reduce spending accordingly.

  • Failing/Stagnant Manufacturing Companies
  • Recommended Spend: 5-10% More Than Current Budget

If the manufacturing business is struggling with net-negative profits, you need to increase your current budget by at least 5-10%. The marketing budget might not be the only thing affecting your profits (consider product revisions), but if you’re in an aggressively competitive industry then marketing can have a serious effect on the success of your product.

Start by increasing the budget for a trial period of 6 months and see how it performs. If you’re seeing an increase in sales, consider bringing the budget down to the previous levels. If you’re satisfied with that progress, make a decision on whether you want to keep the budget increase.

Have more questions? Call, email or text Sandy, leading manufacturing SEO expert at 775-870-0488.

best web design company reno nv 350 x 200